Monday, November 20, 2017

Strength Training Just As Important (If Not More) Than Aerobic Exercises

Lifting before running
After our two beautiful boys came along, my wife used to just run as there was not much time for any other exercise. She found big benefits from minimal running. It improved her mood and energy levels while also lowering her risk of heart disease and stroke.

After a few years of just running, she felt that her fitness level was stagnating and that she was losing strength. So earlier this year, (along with two friends), my wife has been doing twice weekly strength training sessions at the Holland Village F45  gym.

A recent study found strength training just as important (if not more than aerobic training) and can add years to your life. This is the largest study so far (over 80,000 adults) to compare mortality outcomes of different types of exercise people did.

Researchers found that strength training (both gym machines and body weight) decreased the risk of early death (23 percent) and cancer-related death (31 percent).

Earlier I wrote about how weight training can also help solve Singapore's diabetes problem as highlighted by our prime minister during the 2017 National Day Rally. This study lends more weight to my suggestions to help Singaporeans get healthier.

Moreover, the World Health Organization's (WHO) physical activity guidelines suggest 150 minutes of physical activities and two days of strength training every week.

Seems like my wife's twice weekly strength training sessions at the Holland Village F45 is spot on with WHO's guidelines.

For those intimidated by gyms, (be it costs or images of heavy weights), the researchers suggested that body weight exercises like sit-ups, push-ups, lunges and triceps dips done in your own home or local park can be just as beneficial.


Reference

Stamatakis E, Lee I, Bennie J et al (2017). Does Strength Promoting Exercise Confer Unique Health Benefits? A Pooled Analysis Of Eleven Population Cohorts With All-cause, Cancer, and Cardiovascular Mortality Endpoints. Am J Epidemiology. kwx345. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwx345.

Ting Jun having a go with Rachel's help

No comments:

Post a Comment